TWO BITS: swimmers arrested, Heimerdinger fired

1 » A pair of Florida Gators women’s swimmers, juniors Lily Ramirez and Daniela Victoria, have been indefinitely suspended from the team after being arrested for shoplifting at Nordstrom at the Orlando Mall in Orlando, FL on Saturday. “We are extremely disappointed in the actions of two of our student-athletes this past weekend,” head coach Gregg Troy said in a statement. “Both individuals have been suspended indefinitely and will miss the 2011 SEC Swimming Championships and beyond. University of Florida student-athletes are held to a high standard of character. This was unquestionably a massive error in judgment, and our program simply cannot and will not tolerate this type of behavior.”

2 » With the Tennessee Titans hiring a new head coach, offensive coordinator Mike Heimerdinger knew there was a chance he would not be allowed to keep his job. Heimerdinger, who is in the process of getting chemotherapy treatments for a rare form of cancer detected this year, was informed Tuesday that he had officially been fired. “It’s never easy to be fired,” said Heimerdinger, formerly a wide receivers coach with the Gators. “I appreciate my time here, but it’s never easy to be fired.” Heimerdinger delayed cancer treatments during the season in order to continue coaching the Titans but his offense was not as prolific in 2010 as it had been in years past.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

8 Responses to “TWO BITS: swimmers arrested, Heimerdinger fired”

  1. Ken says:

    wow…both sad stories. I hope the team covers his treatments in their separation deal…

  2. Wingtee says:

    Geez now are women are getting into the action. I guess they are a poor mans Peter Warrick. Just trade Nordstrom to diliards . Way to rep ladies!

  3. Gatorgrad79 says:

    This is why I think college scholarship athletes should wear ankle bracelets so the staff/compliance knows where they are every time they leave their house. JUST KIDDING????

  4. Oldflyer says:

    I wonder why folks always refer to an “error in judgment” when describing a criminal act by an athlete? No. This is a dishonest act, deliberately performed for personal gain; or out of malice.

    An error in judgment is something entirely different.

    Extending my thoughts: their actions do not reflect on UF at all; just as Warrick’s did not reflect on FSU. They reflect on the character of the miscreants. The manner in which the institution responds does reflect.

    • Ken says:

      I would say that doing a criminal act would be an error in judgement. It certainly isn’t good judgement.

      As for reflecting on the institution? Of course it reflects on the institution. All people have been able to talk about UF football is all the arrests.

      • Oldflyer says:

        I don’t care that people talk about the arrests. The institution is not responsible for the individual, private, behavior of its students. The fact that people “pin” it on the institution is reflective of irrational behavior in our society. Unfortunately, this behavior has become common among sport’s fans.

        I will grant that if the institution makes a practice of recruiting athletes with a “troubled” history, and these recruits continue to misbehave, then it calls the institution’s “judgment” into question. But, when recruits with a clean history later become miscreants, it only reflects on the institution if it tolerates deviant behavior. As I clearly stated; the institution’s response to the misdeed is refelctive.

        To routinely label conscious, premeditated, criminal acts as poor judgment is simply farcial. Taking one drink too many may be poor judgment. Driving too fast for the prevailing conditions, and crashing, is poor judgment.

  5. Wingtee says:

    Good oldflyer. Words we can live by

  6. Zooker says:

    I agree, the economic down turn has the ladies getting in on the action too… Way to go girls, take GPD’s radar off the football players, well done!!